“Behind the Rifle: Women Soldiers in the Civil War” at June Round Table

On Sunday, June 9th at 3 P.M., the Franklin Civil War Round Table will host author and historian Shelby Harriel who will present “Behind the Rifle: Women Soldiers in the Civil War.”

During the Civil War it was not unheard of to have female soldiers standing shoulder to shoulder with men on the firing lines. These soldiers were disguised as men and had various motivations for going to war. Many wanted to be near their husbands or other loved ones, and some simply sought adventure. Harriel will relate these stories, including women who served on picket duty along the Rappahannock, suffered in Andersonville prison, and incurred wounds in battles such as Gettysburg and the Wilderness.

Shelby Harriel received her B.A. in History and her M.Ed from the University of Southern Mississippi. She has written numerous articles on the Civil War for various publications and has spoken to many groups such as the Louisiana Civil War Round Table and the Louisiana Historical Association’s annual meeting. Her new book, “Behind the Rifle: Women Soldiers in the Civil War Mississippi,” has just been released by the University of Mississippi Press. She last appeared at the FCWRT in 2016 and we are pleased to have her back.  Her book will be available for purchase.

The event is free to the public. The Franklin Civil War Round Table is an educational program of Franklin’s Charge, and meets each month at Carnton Plantation's Fleming Center, 1345 Eastern Flank Circle. For more information, email fcwrt@yahoo.com, or visit https://www.franklinscharge.org/the-round-table

“Confederates Once, Americans Twice: Former Confederates and the Building of Post War America” at April Round Table

On Sunday, April 14th at 3 P.M., the Franklin Civil War Round Table will host author and historian Stephen “Sam” Hood who will present “Confederates Once, Americans Twice:  Former Confederates and the Building of Post War America.”

In the years following the Civil War, large numbers of Confederates veterans both recovered from physical, mental, moral, and economic devastation and attained accomplishments important to moving the United States past the war.   Many major universities, churches and businesses were founded or greatly assisted by the talents of former Confederate soldiers.  Contributions were made by men like Josiah Gorgas, who became vice chancellor of the University of the South and later served as president of the University of Alabama.

Hood, a descendant of General John Bell Hood, resides in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina and grew up in West Virginia.  A graduate of Marshall University, he was later instrumental in building that school’s soccer program, elected to the West Virginia Soccer Hall of Fame and known by many in West Virginia for his contributions to that university. A retired building contractor and Marine Corps veteran, he has served on various boards including Confederate Memorial Hall in New Orleans and the Blue and Gray Educational Society.

The event is free to the public. The Franklin Civil War Round Table is an educational program of Franklin’s Charge, and meets each month at Carnton’s Fleming Center, 1345 Eastern Flank Circle. For more information, email fcwrt@yahoo.com, or visit https://www.franklinscharge.org/the-round-table.

“The Siege of Chattanooga and Wheeler’s Raid” at March Round Table

On Sunday, March 10th at 3 P.M., the Franklin Civil War Round Table will present Dr. Phillip Kimmerly to speak on “The 1863 Siege of Chattanooga and Wheeler’s Raid.

In the fall of 1863, the Federal Army of the Cumberland was trapped in Chattanooga for five harrowing weeks, near starvation, and depending upon a single difficult road over mountainous terrain for survival. Dr. Kimmerly will tell the story of both men and animals suffering and struggling to move badly needed supplies to starving troops to the strategically critical city of Chattanooga. In severe environmental conditions and with the physical limitations of standard-issue quartermaster wagons going up and down rough and dangerous slopes, more than twelve thousand animals would die before the siege was broken and the famous Cracker Line established. During this siege, Confederate General Joe Wheeler’s Sequatchie Valley attack on a ten-mile long federal wagon train destroyed 50% of their supply wagons in one of the biggest captures of Union supplies during the war.
 
Kemmerly is a Professor Emeritus of Geology at Austin Peay State University where he taught for forty years. He is a licensed professional geologist and has served as a geological consultant in both the government and private sectors for over three decades. Since retiring in 2011, he has combined his interest in the Civil War and his scientific background to issues in Civil War military history.  He has published numerous Civil War articles with his latest coming out in the summer of 2019 dealing with how the Army of the Ohio marched past John Bell Hood’s army at Spring Hill. Dr. Kemmerly last spoke at the FCWRT in January 2017 on the topic of environmental conditions during the battle of Nashville.

The event is free to the public. The Franklin Civil War Round Table is an educational program of Franklin’s Charge, and meets each month at Carnton’s Fleming Center, 1345 Eastern Flank Circle. For more information, email fcwrt@yahoo.com, or visit https://www.franklinscharge.org/the-round-table.

“The Rise of Parkers Crossroads Battlefield” at February Round Table

On Sunday, February 10th at 3 P.M., the Franklin Civil War Round Table will present Tennessee General Assembly member Steve McDaniel to speak on “The Rise of the Parkers Crossroads Battlefield.”

In 1993, the Parker's Crossroads Battlefield Association was created under the leadership of McDaniel, and since that time has acquired 349 acres. The battlefield is located halfway between Nashville and Memphis and literally bisected by Interstate-40. It was here Christmas Eve 1862 where federal forces nearly trapped the command of General Nathan Bedford Forrest until he gave the order “charge them both ways.” The audacity of such an order enabled the Confederates to escape the trap and cross the Tennessee River at nearby Clifton. The park has several miles of walking trails, a visitors and event center and is one of the best-preserved battlefields in the country.

Representative McDaniel is a businessowner, public servant, and historian. He has received numerous awards including the Civil War Trust’s State Preservation Leadership Award, the UDC’s Jefferson Davis Award, The Robert E. Lee Award for Heritage Preservation and the Dr. Frank Vandiver Award of the Houston Civil War Round Table.

The event is free to the public. The Franklin Civil War Round Table is an educational program of Franklin’s Charge, and meets each month at Carnton’s Fleming Center, 1345 Eastern Flank Circle. For more information, email fcwrt@yahoo.com, or visit https://www.franklinscharge.org/the-round-table.

“General Grant During Appomattox” at January Round Table

On Sunday, January 13th at 3 P.M., the Franklin Civil War Round Table will present Dr. E. C. (Curt) Fields in a return visit to speak on “General Grant During Appomattox.”

Fields’ life-long interest in the American Civil War and his admiration for General Ulysses S. Grant is the background for his dramatic portrayal of the famous general to groups all over the United States as well as foreign audiences.  Fields is the same height and build as General Grant and his presentation is given in the first person, quoting from Grant’s memoirs and letters.

Fields holds Bachelor and Master’s degrees in Education from the University of Memphis and a Ph.D. in Educational Administration and Curriculum from Michigan State University.  He has spoken on leadership to various corporations including Caterpillar and International Paper. Fields has also served as a Memphis police officer and received a Life Saving Medal for action in the line of duty. He has appeared at numerous Civil War events including the 150th anniversary of Lee’s surrender at Appomattox, and is featured in a Discovery Channel documentary about Grant and several National Park Service visitor center productions.

The event is free to the public. The Franklin Civil War Round Table is an educational program of Franklin’s Charge, and meets each month at Carnton’s Fleming Center, 1345 Eastern Flank Circle. For more information, email fcwrt@yahoo.com, or visit https://www.franklinscharge.org/the-round-table.

“Was the War in Your Backyard?” at December Round Table

On Sunday, December 9th at 3 P.M., the Franklin Civil War Round Table will host historian and author Greg Wade, who will present “Was the War in Your Backyard?”

There were over two hundred military actions in Williamson County and Franklin during the Civil War. Wade will highlight lesser-known battle sites. He will reveal the locations of the first Confederate casualty, actions once fought in today’s exclusive neighborhoods, and some fairly recently discovered unknown soldiers’ graves. Bushwhacking and guerilla activity were rampant during the war years and took place in areas surprising to residents of today’s Franklin.
 

Wade is the founder of the FCWRT and currently serves on the board of Franklin’s Charge and the Battle of Franklin Trust and has been part of the battlefield reclamation movement since 2005. He recently spoke at the annual American Battlefield Trust’s Color Bearers convention as well as organizing and presenting the recent 100th anniversary World War I and Civil War Memorial program at Franklin’s Masonic Lodge. He has presented various topics at Civil War seminars and Round Tables across the country and writes for various historical publications including the Civil War News. In 2014, he released a novel based largely on facts about the horror of life behind the lines in a rural East Tennessee valley called Broken Valley. A graduate of Middle Tennessee State University, Wade and his wife, Beth, reside in Franklin. 

The event is free to the public. The Franklin Civil War Round Table is an educational program of Franklin’s Charge, and meets each month at Carnton’s Fleming Center, 1345 Eastern Flank Circle. For more information, email fcwrt@yahoo.com, or visit https://www.franklinscharge.org/the-round-table.

“Grits to Glory” at November Round Table

On Sunday, November 11th at 3 P.M., the Franklin Civil War Round Table will host award-winning author, musician, historian and journalist Joe Johnston, who will present “Grits to Glory.”

Johnston will relate how the South and its cuisine rose to glory after being destroyed during the Civil War. Three major things came together to create today’s Southern cuisine: the post-war burden of poverty, memories of former slaves and traditions of Native Americans. Johnston will present interesting examples of our food “evolution” such as what Colonel Sanders and General John Hunt Morgan have in common, why oysters and bananas are Southern and which American Indian foods are in our kitchens now.

A native of Missouri, Johnston has published numerous books, and has worked nationally in marketing, music production and film. He was the inventor of the famous McDonald’s Happy Meal. Johnston will have copies of his book, Grits to Glory: How Southern Cookin’ Got So Good, for purchase.

The event is free to the public. The Franklin Civil War Round Table is an educational program of Franklin’s Charge, and meets each month at Carnton’s Fleming Center, 1345 Eastern Flank Circle. For more information, email fcwrt@yahoo.com, or visit https://www.franklinscharge.org/the-round-table.

“The Lost Gettysburg Address” at October Round Table

On Sunday, October 14th at 3 P.M., the Franklin Civil War Round Table will present historian David Dixon, who will speak on the lost Gettysburg address of Charles Anderson.

Charles Anderson was born to a family steeped in American history. His father was an aide-de-camp to Marquis de Lafayette during the Revolutionary War, his uncle was William Clark of Lewis & Clark fame, and his brother surrendered Fort Sumter. During the Civil War he served as colonel of Ohio’s 93rd Infantry, was wounded twice during the Battle of Stones River, and resigned his commission. 

Ascending to Lieutenant Governor of Ohio, Anderson gave a speech at Gettysburg, after Everett and Lincoln at the local Presbyterian Church. His 45-minute speech was well-received but forgotten compared to Everett’s 2-hour oratory and Lincoln’s historic comments. Decades later, when asked for a copy of his speech so it could be enshrined in Gettysburg, he could not find it. David Dixon began his extensive research when the lost address was discovered in 2015, in a cardboard box in Wyoming. 

Dixon earned his B.A. in Political Science from the University of California and his M.A. in history from the University of Massachusetts.  In addition to being featured on various radio programs and many Civil War Round Tables across the country, he has published numerous articles in scholarly journals magazines. 

The event is free to the public. The Franklin Civil War Round Table is an educational program of Franklin’s Charge, and meets each month at Carnton’s Fleming Center, 1345 Eastern Flank Circle. For more information, email fcwrt@yahoo.com, or visit https://www.franklinscharge.org/the-round-table.

“Battle of Johnsonville” at August Round Table

On Sunday, September 9th at 3 P.M., the Franklin Civil War Round Table will present Dr. Jerry Wooten, Park Manager at Tennessee’s Bicentennial Capitol Mall State Park, who will speak on the Battle of Johnsonville, and its critical role as a key Federal war time supply depot.

It was at the Battle of Johnsonville in the fall of 1864 that Confederate general Nathan Bedford Forrest captured several Union vessels using them to destroy supplies and arms in one of the largest losses of Union materials during the war. Dr. Wooten, former director of the Johnsonville State Historic Park, will discuss the war era facilities there, including some remains still visible today. Johnsonville, located in West Tennessee, was largely flooded after the construction of a dam in 1944.

Originally from Clarksville, Wooten received a Ph.D. in Public History at Middle Tennessee State, a Masters’ Degree in Public Administration from Murray State and his Bachelor of Arts in American History from Austin Peay State University. His first book, Johnsonville: The End of the Line, will be released next year. Some of Wooten’s prior positions include the Director of State Historic Sites for the Tennessee Historical Commission, Executive Director of the River Heritage Museum in Paducah, Kentucky, and Director of South Union’s Shaker Museum. He has received numerous awards for excellence in Resource Management and Stewardship of Historic Sites.

The event is free to the public. The Franklin Civil War Round Table is an educational program of Franklin’s Charge, and meets each month at Carnton's Fleming Center, 1345 Eastern Flank Circle. For more information, email fcwrt@yahoo.com, or visit https://www.franklinscharge.org/the-round-table.

“Embalming Surgeons in Civil War” at August Round Table

On Sunday, August 12th at 3 P.M., the Franklin Civil War Round Table will present Dr. Todd Van Beck, who will speak on “Embalming Surgeons in the Great American Civil War.”

At the beginning of the Civil War there was no preparation for what would happen with those who died.  The common thought was that the war would be short and almost no one would be killed. Almost 700,000 deaths later, the process of caring for the dead became a huge chapter of the Civil War story. Dr. Van Beck will give an in-depth look at the huge challenge of caring for the living by processing the dead during the war.

Van Beck has been in funeral service, bereavement care, and church lay ministry for almost fifty years.  He is the author of hundreds of articles and books and a speaker on a wide variety of topics ranging from funeral customs to counseling and the psychology of grief.  He has spoken in Europe, New Zealand and around the world.  He received his Bachelor of Arts Degree from Mount Mercy University, a Masters’ Degree from Mount Saint Mary’s and an Honorary Doctorate Degree from the Commonwealth Institute of Funeral Service.  He has been recognized by many professional organizations for his work in the art and science of embalming.  He is currently the Director of Continuing Education Studies at the John A. Gupton College in Nashville.

The event is free to the public. The Franklin Civil War Round Table is an educational program of Franklin’s Charge, and meets each month at Carnton's Fleming Center, 1345 Eastern Flank Circle. For more information, email fcwrt@yahoo.com, or visit https://www.franklinscharge.org/the-round-table.

“Rising from the Ashes: William Holland and the Cemetery Community” at July Round Table

On Sunday, July 8th at 3 P.M., the Franklin Civil War Round Table will host Stones River National Battlefield Park ranger Jim Lewis, who will present, “Rising from the Ashes: William Holland and the Cemetery Community.”

At the end of the Civil War, battlefield landscapes were often changed forever, especially when cemeteries were created. In the year following the war, William Holland and his comrades from the 111th United States Colored Troops helped establish Stones River National Cemetery, while also rebuilding their own lives on the very blood-stained fields they had fought across. Ranger Lewis will explore the evolution and impact to the community of this iconic cemetery.

Born in Burlington, Vermont and raised in New Jersey, Lewis is a graduate of Cornell University and resides in Murfreesboro. He has served in the National Park Service since 1991 and has been at Stones River since 1997, now as the park’s Chief of Interpretation & Cultural Resource Management. He serves on the advisory board of the Tennessee Civil War Preservation Association and is a founding member of the Middle Tennessee Civil War Round Table.

The event is free to the public. The Franklin Civil War Round Table is an educational program of Franklin’s Charge, and meets each month at Carnton's Fleming Center, 1345 Eastern Flank Circle. For more information, email fcwrt@yahoo.com, or visit https://www.franklinscharge.org/round-table.

“General Grant: The War Years” at June Round Table

On Sunday, June 10th at 3 P.M., the Franklin Civil War Round Table will present Dr. E. C. (Curt) Fields, who will speak on “General Grant: The War Years.”

Fields’ life-long interest in the American Civil War and his admiration for General Ulysses S. Grant is the background for his dramatic portrayal of the famous general to groups all over the United States as well as foreign audiences.  Fields is the same height and build as General Grant and his presentation is given in the first person, quoting from Grant’s memoirs and letters.

Fields holds Bachelor and Master’s degrees in Education from the University of Memphis and a Ph.D. in Educational Administration and Curriculum from Michigan State University.  He has spoken on leadership to various corporations including Caterpillar and International Paper. Fields has also served as a Memphis police officer and received a Life Saving Medal for action in the line of duty. He has appeared at numerous Civil War events including the 150th anniversary of Lee’s surrender at Appomattox, and is featured in a Discovery Channel documentary about Grant and several National Park Service visitor center productions.

The event is free to the public. The Franklin Civil War Round Table is an educational program of Franklin’s Charge, and meets each month at Carnton's Fleming Center, 1345 Eastern Flank Circle. For more information, email fcwrt@yahoo.com, or visit http://www.franklinscharge.com/round-table.

“The Retreat Across Williamson County” Civil War Tour

There will be no May lecture meeting. Instead the Franklin Civil War Round Table will conduct a Civil War tour on Saturday, May 12th. The tour will trace the December 17th retreat of the Army of Tennessee following the Battle of Nashville across Williamson County.

The tour participants will meet at Brentwood Baptist Church on Concord Road and begin the tour at 8:30 A.M. sharp. This is the location where General James Wilson realized the Confederates were still a dangerous enemy, where one of the largest cavalry charges in American history occurred, and where two soldiers’ actions would earn Medals of Honor.

The tour should be finished about 11:30 A.M. and there is a possible group lunch to follow.  Please reserve your spot by emailing:  gregwade55@yahoo.com. In the event the tour is cancelled due to weather, registrants will be notified by email.

This tour is free to Round Table members. Donations will be requested from non-members with proceeds going to the Wilder Flag Fund.

“The Campaigns and Battles of Forrest: 1861-1863” at April Round Table

On Sunday, April 8th at 3 P.M., the Franklin Civil War Round Table will host retired Special Forces Brigadier General John Scales, who will speak on his new book, The Campaigns and Battles of Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest: Kentucky to Chickamauga 1861-1863.

General Scales, using the lens of his decades of professional service, will analyze Forrest’s wartime actions and how these decisions and didn’t effect the war in the Wester Theater.

Scales has a Ph.D. in Engineering and spent thirty years in the military, which included service in Vietnam and Afghanistan. He has two previous books:  Sherman Invades Georgia (Naval Institute Press, 2006) and A Reluctant Hero’s Footsteps (Westbow Press, 2012). 
 
A resident of Huntsville, Scales is past president of the Tennessee Valley Civil War Round Table and leads campaign tours in Alabama, Tennessee and Georgia.

The event is free to the public. The Franklin Civil War Round Table is an educational program of Franklin’s Charge, and meets each month at Carnton Plantation's Fleming Center, 1345 Eastern Flank Circle. For more information, email fcwrt@yahoo.com, or visit http://www.franklinscharge.org/the-round-table.

"General John Wilder" at March Round Table

On Sunday, March 11th at 3 P.M., the Franklin Civil War Round Table will host author, archivist and historian Myers Brown who will present a program on Union General John Wilder

Federal General John Wilder and his “Lightning Brigade” of mounted infantry equipped with Spencer repeating rifles had a great impact on the war in Middle Tennessee. At the Battle of Hoovers Gap near Tullahoma, the effect of the “repeaters” forced a rethinking by both armies on how to arm their troops. Wilder played a key role at the battle of Chickamauga and his troops also made a brief appearance in Franklin.

After the war Wilder served as the mayor of Chattanooga and was known as a leader of the “reconciliation movement” promoting peace and unity.  He also played a large role in the establishment of the Chickamauga National Park.

A native of Old Hickory, Tennessee, Brown received his B.A. in History from Oglethorpe University and his M.A. in Public History from Middle Tennessee State University.  He is a Fellow and a former Governor of the Company of Military Historians and has served on several boards related to historic preservation in Tennessee.
 
Prior to joining the Tennessee State Library and Archives, Brown served as curator with the Tennessee State Museum, the Alabama Historical Commission and as Curator of Military History at the Atlanta History Center.  He has authored several books and served as editor of the Best of the Tennessee Historical Quarterly, Volume 5.
 
Brown is an adjunct professor at Goodpasture Christian School and has taught at Trevecca Nazarene University in Nashville, Cumberland University and Volunteer State Community College in Gallatin

The event is free to the public. The Franklin Civil War Round Table is an educational program of Franklin’s Charge, and meets each month at Carnton Plantation's Fleming Center, 1345 Eastern Flank Circle. For more information, email fcwrt@yahoo.com, or visit http://www.franklinscharge.org/the-round-table.

“Confederates Once, Americans Twice” at February Round Table

On Sunday, February 11th at 3 P.M., the Franklin Civil War Round Table will host author and historian Stephen “Sam” Hood who will present “Confederates Once, Americans Twice: Former Confederates and the Building of Post-War America.”

In the years following the Civil War, a large number of Confederates veterans both recovered from physical, mental, moral, and economic devastation and attained accomplishments important to moving the United States past the war.  Many major universities, churches and businesses were founded or greatly assisted by the talents of former Confederate soldiers. Contributions were made by men like Josiah Gorgas, who became vice-chancellor of the University of the South and later served as president of the University of Alabama.

Hood resides in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina and grew up in West Virginia.  A graduate of Marshall University, he was later instrumental in building that school’s soccer program, elected to the West Virginia Soccer Hall of Fame and known by many in West Virginia for his contributions to that university. A retired building contractor and Marine Corps veteran, he has served on various boards including Confederate Memorial Hall in New Orleans and the Blue and Gray Educational Society.

The event is free to the public.The Franklin Civil War Round Table is an educational program of Franklin’s Charge, and meetseach month at Carnton Plantation's Fleming Center, 1345 Eastern Flank Circle. For more information,emailfcwrt@yahoo.com, or visit http://www.franklinscharge.org/the-round-table.

“The Freedmen’s Bureau in Williamson County” at January Round Table

On Sunday, January 14th at 3 P.M., the Franklin Civil War Round Table will host noted Williamson County historian Rick Warwick who will present “The Freedmen’s Bureau in Williamson County.”

The U.S. Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands, popularly known as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established in 1865 by Congress to assist former slaves in the aftermath of the Civil War. The Bureau was intended to provide food, housing, medical help, schools and legal assistance to the newly freed population in the South. Rick Warwick has researched the original labor contracts signed by 476 former slaves in Williamson County and will be discussing the difficult “negotiations” experienced by these men, usually with their previous owners.  Oftentimes these contracts were turned against the men giving the landowners great advantage.

Warwick is the historian for the Heritage Foundation and a retired Williamson County school teacher who has led in preservation efforts for decades in the Franklin area. His numerous books about Williamson County have been critically important in the documentation of the area’s history. He is also the editor of the Williamson County Historical Society Journal.

The event is free to the public. The Franklin Civil War Round Table is an educational program of Franklin’s Charge, and meets each month at Carnton Plantation's Fleming Center, 1345 Eastern Flank Circle. For more information, email fcwrt@yahoo.com, or visit http://www.franklinscharge.org/the-round-table.

“Forbidden, Hidden and Forgotten: Women in the Ranks” at December Round Table

On Sunday, December 10th at 3 P.M., the Franklin Civil War Round Table will host Shelby Harriel who will present “Forbidden, Hidden and Forgotten: Women in the Ranks.”

There are many documented cases of women actually serving in the military during the Civil War. Their wartime experiences and sacrifices were often similar to their male counterparts.  Women served on picket duty along the snowy banks of the Rappahannock, languished in Andersonville Prison, suffered horrible wounds during the battle of the Wilderness and lost their lives during Pickett’s Charge.

Harriel received her B.A. in History and later her M. Ed from the University of Southern Mississippi. She is currently an instructor of Mathematics at Pearl River Community College. Harriel has written numerous Civil War articles and has spoken for groups such as the Louisiana Civil War Round Table and the Louisiana Historical Association.

The event is free to the public. The Franklin Civil War Round Table is an educational program of Franklin’s Charge, and meets each month at Carnton Plantation's Fleming Center, 1345 Eastern Flank Circle. For more information, email fcwrt@yahoo.com, or visit http://www.franklinscharge.org/the-round-table.

“Walking the Line: The Defenses Around Atlanta” at November Round Table

On Sunday, November 12th at 3 P.M., the Franklin Civil War Round Table will present astronomer and author Dr. Larry Krumenaker, who will speak on “Walking the Line: The Defenses Around Atlanta.”

After the fall of Vicksburg on July 4, 1863, the Confederacy knew well that Atlanta would be a target in the future of Union Army attacks. Construction of an extensive ten-mile defensive ring began a month later and was nearly completed by October

Dr. Krumenaker, an accomplished astronomer, will give an illustrated tour of the Atlanta defensive works, showing photographs and describing the thirty-six forts built along that line, if they are extant today, can be visited, and how to find them.  He became fascinated with these massive earthworks after moving to Atlanta a number of years ago.

Receiving his B.S. and M.S. degrees in astronomy from Case Western Reserve University, Krumenaker obtained his Ph.D. in Science from the University of Georgia.  He is credited with the discovery of the only known micro-quasar in the Milky Way.

Krumenaker has worked as an educator in Atlanta and the University of Cologne while writing extensively on astronomy and historical tourism.  He has spoken to round tables in the U.S. and Europe.  His most recent work is the Colonia Tour Book, A Tourist’s Guide to the Ancient Roman City that became Cologne.  He is currently working on a book on the Atlanta Campaign called Traces of War.

The event is free to the public. The Franklin Civil War Round Table is an educational program of Franklin’s Charge, and meets each month at Carnton Plantation's Fleming Center, 1345 Eastern Flank Circle. For more information, email fcwrt@yahoo.com, or visit http://www.franklinscharge.org/the-round-table.

Friends of Fort Negley at September Round Table

On Sunday, September 10th at 3 P.M., the Franklin Civil War Round Table will host the Friends of Fort Negley, who will present a special and informative program concerning the future of the Fort Negley complex in Nashville.

Since the relocation of the Nashville Sounds from their Greer Stadium location, there has been much speculation about the future of the site. Because the baseball stadium literally adjoined the walls of Fort Negley, Civil War historians and green space advocates have lobbied for the property to be made part of the Fort Negley grounds, as it was during the Civil War. Not only was this structure a critical part of the extensive works protecting the city during its federal occupation, it was constructed in large part by impressed black labor. Many of these slaves and freedmen died during the fort’s construction and are interred nearby, perhaps even on the site itself.

There is now a massive proposed commercial development on this important ground that has great significance to Nashville’s Civil War and Reconstruction history. The Friends of Fort Negley will present their vision for the property and the fight by citizens to stop the suggested retail, housing and commercial complex at the Greer Stadium location.

The event is free to the public. The Franklin Civil War Round Table is an educational program of Franklin’s Charge, and will meet this month only at the Hiram Masonic Lodge at 115 2nd Ave South, Franklin. For more information, email fcwrt@yahoo.com, or visit http://www.franklinscharge.org/the-round-table.